BeSpatial / BeSmart'19 Executive Forum featured participants

Full Day Event: May 2, 2019 

Bayview Club, 25 Fairway Drive, Thornhill L3T 3X1

 Featured panelists below list from our preliminary agenda.

Register  

 Welcome from President, BeSpatial

Catherine Fitzgerald, Manager, Information Services, Municipality of Chatham-Kent

Insight: GeoSpatial and Information Management professionals are critical partners in the development of Smart Cities. The expert members of BeSpatial connect patterns with place and develop data into insights. The BeSpatial Geospatial professional community has a leadership role to play in protecting private information while developing partnerships for data sharing and supporting information rich communities.

  Opening Insights and Panel 1. Data Analytics, Open Data and Smart Business Decisions

Jan Kestle: President and CEO of Environics Analytics (EA)

 Insights:   We live in an era of evidence-based decision-making. Businesses and governments alike are expected to use data and technology to make better and smarter decisions. But how well analysts use the wide variety of available data is the single biggest contributor to the outcome. Normalizing, weighting, standardizing, anonymizing and integrating all types of data to transform them into insights—that’s the challenge. Data scientists require in-depth knowledge of how the data were assembled, what is allowed under both the law and “good ethics” and what methods are best suited to which business problems.

In our view at Environics Analytics, GIS and spatial analysis experts have demonstrated over the past three decades that geography is the secret sauce in making big data usable. The popular tagline from Esri in the ’90s—“everything happens somewhere”—has never been more timely. Whether analysts are looking at overtly spatial problems or just trying to get an integrated view of citizens and patrons, spatial analysis is an underused “best practice” in privacy-compliant and accurate data transformation.

And when we are looking at the development of SMART cities, the data sources and technology can be the foundation of transformative thinking. At BeSpatial 2019 the world of public policy, technology, methodology, ethics and program delivery will come together in a single event with people and topics crossing the “silos”. The data are there. The tech is there. The question is whether the will is there to change the culture and move us forward to SMART? Join the dialogue—help make it happen.

 Jan Kestle has been a leader in the marketing information industry for more than forty years. An expert in using statistics and mathematics to help solve business challenges, she directed the initiatives that led to the creation of EA’s PRIZM5 segmentation system, WealthScapes financial database and ENVISION5 business intelligence platform, among other data-based products.

Over the years, Jan has helped hundreds of customers—in industries ranging from finance and retail to the not-for-profit sector—turn data and analytics into insight, strategy and engagement. Prior to founding EA in 2003, Jan was president of Compusearch and spent 19 years at the Ontario Statistical Centre. Active in the marketing community, she is a member of the National Statistics Council, the Board of Directors of the Canadian Marketing Association and the Advisory Board of Ryerson University School of Geography. A frequent conference speaker, she is the recipient of a Bachelor of Science degree in applied mathematics from the University of Western Ontario.

 Panel 1. Data Analytics, Open Data and Smart Business Decisions

Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault, Assistant Professor of Critical Media and Big Data, Carleton University 

Insight:  Data and related data technologies are core infrastructure for cities and are more that IT and operations, and I would argue that smart city technologies should be part of urban plans and be discussed with residents. These large technological systems no only manage and monitor infrastructure, they are infrastructure that involve, data, code, algorithms, apps, sensors, and platforms that will manage traffic, utilities, equipment and bridges, but also, they are technologies that observe, survey and nudge social behaviour. It might therefore be time for social and technological impact assessments – social, environment, economic, and public good. We will need to apply systems thinking across all business units, from social services to transit, and integrated across digital strategies, open government and data, and procurement. The ideals of open smart cities are moving us in that direction, and it might be better to start that opening consultative processes now before we get locked into large technological solutions that may not be in the public interest.

Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault is Assistant Professor in Critical Media and Big Data, Communication and Media Studies, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton University and Cross Appointed to the MA in Digital Humanities. Her work on open and big data and open smart cities, is international, transdisciplinary and multi-sectoral. She is one of the founders of the new domain of critical data studies and of open data in Canada and has expertise in data infrastructures, spatial media and smart cities.

As a board member of the Institute for Data Science she bridges computer science, social theory and public policy. She serves on the multi-stakeholder forum for Canadian Open Government Civil Society Network, is on the Board for Open North Canada, and is a research associate with the Manyooth University Social Science Institute in Ireland, the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre at Carleton University and the Centre for Law Technology and Society at Ottawa University and the Steering Committee for Research Data Canada.

 Panel 1. Data Analytics, Open Data and Smart Business Decisions

Ed Rubinstein, Director of Environmental Compliance, Risk and Sustainability, University Health Network (UHN)

Insight:  The use of “smart building” technologies and analytics holds a lot of promise for both optimizing building operations and managing energy use.  However, implementation of smart building technologies can be challenging for older and complex buildings such as hospitals.  In addition to giving an overview of the potential for smart buildings in healthcare, I will present an overview of the University Health Network’s ongoing investigation into the technology and some of the results to date.

Ed Rubinstein is the University Health Network’s Director of Environmental Compliance, Risk and Sustainability. He’s been leading the hospital’s many environment programs since 1999 and has helped UHN become a leader in environmental sustainability in health care.

Both UHN and Ed’s leadership in the field of “greening health care” have been acknowledged with several awards, including from the Ontario Hospital Association, Canadian College of Health Leaders, Natural Resources Canada, Practice Greenhealth and the Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment; Ed was recognized as one of “Canada’s Clean 16” in 2018.

 Panel 1. Data Analytics, Open Data and Smart Business Decisions

Ian Williams, Manager of the Business Intelligence and Analytics Unit, Toronto Police Services (TPS) 

Insight: The Toronto Police Service innovation and analytics approach has found success in integrating it’s Enterprise GIS system to deliver solutions within the organization.

Ian Williams is currently the Manager of the Business Intelligence and Analytics Unit within the Chief’s Office at the Toronto Police Service.  Ian provides leadership and management of information through governance, project management and data analytics initiatives throughout the organization. Ian is also the Service’s lead on innovation and engagement with startups.

Ian has spent the past 10 years at the Toronto Police Service where he has been involved in Organized Crime, Terrorism, and Human Trafficking projects leading up to his current role.

Ian has Masters Degrees in Public Policy, Administration & Law, as well as in Spatial Analysis.  He also holds a BA in Geographic Analysis as well as a Graduate Diploma’s in Justice System Administration and International & Security Studies.

 Moderator: 1. Data Analytics, Open Data and Smart Business Decisions

Jury Konga, Ambassador, Open Knowledge Canada, former president, BeSpatial / urisa ontario



 Video lead-in to Panel 2: Legal and Political Challenges in Data Collection and Access

Dr. Ann Cavoukian, Distinguished Expert-in-Residence - Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence at Ryerson University 

Insight: If you want your business to succeed, lead by gaining the trust of your customers. The best way to do this is by ensuring that their privacy is respected and their data are strongly protected. Embedding privacy, by design, into your operations builds trust and loyalty like no other -- leading to a strong competitive advantage: Win/Win!

Dr. Ann Cavoukian is recognized as one of the world’s leading privacy experts. Dr. Cavoukian served an unprecedented three terms as the Information & Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, Canada. There she created Privacy by Design, a framework that seeks to proactively embed privacy into the design specifications of information technologies, networked infrastructure and business practices, thereby achieving the strongest protection possible. In 2010, International Privacy Regulators unanimously passed a Resolution recognizing Privacy by Design as an international standard. Since then, PbD has been translated into 40 languages

She is presently the Distinguished Expert-in-Residence, leading the Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence at Ryerson University. Dr. Cavoukian is also a Senior Fellow of the Ted Rogers Leadership Centre at Ryerson University, and a Faculty Fellow of the Center for Law, Science & Innovation at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

Dr. Cavoukian is the author of two books, “The Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust” with Tyler Hamilton and “Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World” with Don Tapscott. She has received numerous awards recognizing her leadership in privacy, including being named as one of the Top 25 Women of Influence in Canada, named among the Top 10 Women in Data Security and Privacy, named as one of the ‘Power 50’ by Canadian Business, named as one of the Top 100 Leaders in Identity, she was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal by the Governor General of Canada for her outstanding work on creating Privacy by Design and taking it global (May, 2017), named as one of the 50 Most Impactful Smart Cities Leaders, (November, 2017), named among the Top Women in Tech, (December, 2017), and most recently, was awarded the Toastmasters District 60 Communication and Leadership Award, (April, 2018).


Panel 2: Legal and Political Challenges in Data Collection and Access

Campbell Pattersonfounding partner of CP Communications (CPC)

Insight: The genie is out of the bottle and the cart is before the horse.  Because governments are slow to adapt and because tech companies move fast there is a large gap between government’s understanding and ability to protect citizen’s right to privacy and security and tech’s ability to know more about a person’s life, habits and preferences than they know themselves.  The solutions for closing the gap are complex, myriad and murky but for all concerned the solutions need to be found soon if Article 12 of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights: No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honor and reputation.the Security of the person is a basic entitlement guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations in 1948.

Bio: Campbell Patterson is the founding partner of CP Communications (CPC). Campbell's extensive career has seen him working as Account Supervisor for J. Walter Thompson Advertising and VP Marketing for a McDonald’s Restaurants licensee. From a technology perspective, Campbell has developed strategic and marketing plans for such household names as IBM, Hewlett‐Packard, Apple, Sprint, and AT&T.

For the past fifteen years CPC, has been actively engaged helping regions, counties, municipalities, utilities, school boards, hospitals and user‐based consortiums in Canada evaluate broadband networking opportunities, apply for funding assistance, researching and writing business cases, crafting business plans; and designing, procuring, building, deploying, and project managing community broadband networking operations. 

Campbell co‐authored a submission to the Intelligent Community Forum that resulted in the City of Kingston receiving a Top 7 intelligent community of the year designation in 2014 out of several hundred submissions from around the world and he is currently the chair of the Technical Committee for ICF Canada working on broadband advocacy issues. CPC was engaged as the technical consultants on the swiftnetwork.ca project to develop the Feasibility Study, Business Case and Funding Application which resulted in the project receiving $180 million in federal and provincial funding, making it the largest publicly funded broadband project in Canada to date, however, CPC has ceased to be involved in SWIFT since mid‐2018. CPC developed similar business cases and technical plans for Niagara Region, Town of Caledon and the Town of Collingwood during this period. CPC authored Intelligent Community Plans each for the City of Niagara Falls and Niagara Region based on the ICF “Virtuous Circle” model. The City of Niagara Falls was selected as a Smart21 Intelligent Community in 2017.

CPC is currently engaged project managing the municipal fibre optic network in the City of Kingston and implementing a smart city strategy developed by the CPC for the City of Kingston which included a broadband infrastructure gap analysis. In addition, CPC is leading the development of a diverse transport fibre build between Toronto and Montreal and the construction of a tier 4 data centre on behalf of Utilities Kingston. CPC is also part of a team developing a Business Plan for the Valley Community Fibre Network in Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia. CPC recently started completing a “one‐dig” policy for the City of Pickering – which is an amendment to their official plan for civil infrastructure to make it faster, easier and cheaper for the municipality and telecom service providers to deploy fibre optic cables throughout the community.

Panel 2. Legal and Political Challenges in Data Collection and Access

Fraser Mann, Partner/Lawyer, Mann Symons LLP

Insight: The spatial relationships that define a small region are a valuable asset, and an understanding of the pattern of those relationships can be an important instrument to drive change. For example, information about these patterns might show a municipality: (i) where bicycling infrastructure is most needed; (ii) if efficiencies can be gained by adjusting waste collection routes; and (iii) what the best locations may be for a public health “pop-up” facility. However, the collection and use of hyperlocal data creates operational and legal challenges for municipalities and other public sector entities.

Bio: Fraser Mann is a founding partner of Mann Symons LLP, and was previously a partner at several prominent Canadian law firms. His practice is primarily in the areas of technology and procurement law, and related areas of privacy, intellectual property and ehealth law. He represents clients at all stages of the procurement cycle, with a particular focus on large outsourcing agreements, telecom and IT service agreements (including SaaS and managed services agreements), software licenses and software development agreements. He acts for various public sector and broader public sector clients, for not for-profit organizations and suppliers of technology products and services.

Fraser is Past President of the Canadian Technology Law Association (CanTech). He has served as Chair of the International Law Section of the Canadian Bar Association, and Co-Chair of the Technology Law Committee of the International Bar Association. He is currently President of the Toronto branch of the Canadian International Council. He is the author of Computer Technology and the Law in Canada, co-author of Internet Law, and co-editor of Electronic Commerce: A Practitioner's Guide and of Mann's Technology Law News.

Panel 2. Legal and Political Challenges in Data Collection and Access

Juliet Slemming, Senior Legal Counsel, Privacy Officer at Teranet

Insight: Privacy risk management frameworks help organizations integrate privacy into all aspects of the business. Part of these frameworks are the implementation of strategies to identify, manage and mitigate both external and internal risks.  

Juliet received her LL.B from the University of New Brunswick in 1990, and was called to the Ontario Bar in 1992 and received an LL.M from Osgoode Hall law School in 2001.  She has been with Teranet since 1993 first as legal counsel – operations supporting the land automation and conversion project in Ontario, she currently supports Teranet’s corporate legal team and is responsible for all corporate privacy matters.

 Panel 2. Legal and Political Challenges in Data Collection and Access 

Roy Wiseman, co-Chair;  former Executive Director, MISA/ASIM (Canada), former CIO, Region of Peel

Insight: Fundamental to the notion of a smart city is the idea of using technology to improve services provided by the city to its residents and visitors. Increasingly, this has meant using smart devices to gather data, much/most of it location-based, on both the state of the city’s infrastructure, as well as the needs and activities of its people, as they navigate through our community.

This new smart city paradigm provides both major opportunities and major challenges: the opportunities relate to how we can gather, analyze and make the best use of these mountains of data; the challenges are about taking advantage of these opportunities, while respecting fundamental rights to privacy. Our BeSpatial/BeSmart 2019 Executive Forum will explore both the challenges and the opportunities – and finding the right balance.

Roy Wiseman retired from the Region of Peel in 2011, after a long career as IT Director and as the Region’s first Chief Information Officer (CIO).

Roy has been active in various municipal/public sector associations, including being Executive Director for MISA/ASIM Canada, President of MISA Ontario, President of the Institute for Citizen Centred Service and municipal representative on the Public Sector CIO Council.  He is a regular contributor of articles on the use of technology in government.

Roy was the first municipal recipient of the Heintzman Award for leadership in promoting citizen-centred service within the Canadian public sector and also received the Peter Bennett Award for his outstanding contribution to the Canadian municipal IT community.  In 2013, MISA Ontario created the Roy Wiseman Award, presented annually to an Ontario municipal employee who is recognized as a role model and mentor, demonstrating integrity and respect with peers and fostering inter-jurisdictional relationships.

Moderator

Panel 2. Legal and Political Challenges in Data Collection and Access

Mary Ellen Bench, City Solicitor, City of Mississauga

Mary Ellen Bench graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1984 and was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1986.  She joined the City of Mississauga in May, 2001 as City Solicitor.  In 2003 the International Municipal Lawyers Association (“IMLA”) conferred upon her the designation of Local Government Fellow.  In 2006 she achieved the designation of Certified Specialist (Municipal Law – Local Government/Land Use Planning and Development Law) from the Law Society of Upper Canada. In 2015 she was granted the designation of Certified In-House Counsel, Canada (CIC.C) by the Canadian Corporate Counsel Association and the Rotman School of Management.  Mary Ellen is Immediate Past President of IMLA.  She is also a Board member of the Women’s General Counsel of Canada (WGCC).  Outside of law, she is Secretary to CanoeKayak Canada’s Western Ontario Division and a member of CanoeKayak Canada’s Planning Committee and a National level official.

Panel 3. Community Broadband and Economic Development

Dan Mathieson, Mayor of Stratford

Insight: The City of Stratford has made significant investments in digital infrastructure. Stratford offers a citywide wireless network that includes 60 kilometers of buried fiber optic high speed internet cable and 400 communications towers. The presence of digital infrastructure has made Stratford the ideal real-life location to test new technology in a “living lab” environment.  For example, Stratford has partnered with the Automotive Parts Manufacturers Association (APMA) to position itself as Ontario’s first real life testing ground for autonomous vehicles.  Stratford has also attracted a data center for one of Canada’s largest financial institutions, and has partnered with the University of Waterloo to open a satellite campus that offers a renowned digital media program.  Stratford’s success demonstrates the importance of local innovation, and illustrates the economic development opportunities available to municipalities that invest in digital infrastructure.  

Dan Mathieson is in his fifth term as Mayor of the City of Stratford and during his tenure, he has been a member of numerous boards and committees. He is currently the Chair of the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC), Past Chair of Kings University College at Western University, Chair of the Stratford Police Services Board, Board Member of Hampton Financial Corporation and serves on many local boards and organizations.

Dan was awarded the Alumni Award of Excellence from the Master of Public Administration at Western University and he was the 2016 Western University, Public Administration Distinguished Lecturer in Residence. He has received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, as well as the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal.

Dan holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Guelph and a Masters of Public Administration Degree from the University of Western Ontario. He is a graduate of the ICD.D Certification Program from the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. 

  Panel 3. Community Broadband and Economic Development

Doug Lindeblom, Director, Economic Strategy, York Region

Insight: Doug will provide insights on the effect the York Region Broadband Strategy has had on economic development activities in York Region. This will include the formation of YTN Telecom Network Inc. – a corporation created to manage access to the Region’s optical fibre network – and York’s designation as an Intelligent Community by the Intelligent Community Forum.

Doug Lindeblom has over 30 years’ experience in economic development with both the public and private sectors. After gaining a planning degree from Ryerson University, Doug worked in the real estate field through most of the 1980's for a national commercial broker.  He then moved into the municipal realm in economic development positions at both the local and regional level.  During this time he took a 2 year secondment at an agency undertaking international investment attraction on behalf of the Greater Toronto Area.  In September of 2010, Doug joined York Region as Director, Economic Strategy.

Panel 3. Community Broadband and Economic Development

Dr. Helen HamblyAssociate Professor, University of Guelph & Project Leader, the R2B2 (Regional and Rural Broadband project), SWIFT

Insight:  An infrastructure investment such as a fibre optic network cannot be managed if it can't be measured. Data to inform decision-making for planning and evaluating broadband investment is one of the key constraints affecting investment in digital economies. The social benefit of internet is evidenced with quality and quantity of data, collected over time.  Several key points for accessing and stewarding data for broadband will be highlighted in this discussion.  

Dr. Helen Hambly is an Associate Professor in the School of Environmental Design and Rural Development in the Ontario Agricultural College of the University of Guelph. Dr. Hambly research crosses information, communication and rural society. Her expertise lies in communication for social and environmental change, innovation research methods and data science. She leads the R2B2project.ca Ontario’s largest public-private partnership (P3) funded research initiative for rural internet. The project conducts geospatial and econometric analysis for evidence-based decision-making for public investment in regional and rural broadband.

Before joining the University of Guelph, Dr. Hambly worked in international R&D programs. She has professional work experience with The World Bank, United Nations and the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. Her expertise covers topics such as knowledge mobilization and information and communication technologies for social inclusion and agricultural innovation. Helen grew up on a family farm near Guelph, Ontario.

 Panel 3. Community Broadband and Economic Development

John Henry, Chair, Regional Council, Durham

Insight: Durham recently approved a Broadband Strategy and Action Plan to guide us toward a digitally-connected Region.  Our society and economy increasingly rely on online interactions.  The Region must embrace and enable this evolution to attract investment. Fast, effective broadband infrastructure is vital to internet-enabled data-driven technologies that now propel business growth.  The Region’s competitiveness and ability to grow and diversify our economy depends on reliable digital connectivity. All levels of government play a role in ensuring investments in connectivity.  Partnerships and collaboration will be essential to defining, developing and continuing to grow a broadband network to serve all of Durham.

Bio: Elected as Durham’s Regional Chair and CEO in 2018, John Henry served as the Mayor of Oshawa from 2010-2018, and Regional Councillor for Oshawa’s Ward 5 from 2006-2010. He has previously served as a member of the Regional Planning & Economic Development Committee, as Chair of the Durham Region Local Housing Corporation, member of the Durham Region Transit Executive Committee and the Durham Environmental Advisory Committee.

Born and raised in Oshawa and a dedicated volunteer, John has a vested interest in the future development, prosperity and quality of life for Durham residents, while keeping a close eye on fiscal responsibility.

John is a graduate of R.S. McLaughlin C.V.I., Durham College, George Brown College and Panasonic’s Corporate School. He is also a trained Industrial Fire Fighter, Ice Rescue Specialist and Dive Rescue Specialist.

Regional Chair Henry and his wife Katherine, a retired Pharmacist, have two daughters, Danielle who is a Speech Pathologist and Jessica, who is an Officer for the Royal Canadian Army and working towards a degree in Dentistry at McGill University.

 Panel 3. Community Broadband and Economic Development

Toby Lennox, President & CEO, Toronto Global

 Insight: The competition among countries and municipalities for foreign direct investment is becoming increasingly more intense. Toby Lennox will present the experience of municipalities in the Toronto Region on the advantages of municipalities working together from a regional perspective to increase the opportunities for attracting FDI. Using the example of the Toronto Region’s bid for Amazon HQ2 as a case study, Toby will discuss the lessons learned and what can work for municipalities.

Toby is the President and CEO of Toronto Global, the investment promotion agency for the Toronto Region. Leading a team of client services, marketing, communications and research professionals, he oversees all aspects of Toronto Global’s foreign direct investment attraction efforts. Prior to assuming this role, Toby spent 18 years at the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, working in various capacities. Most recently, Toby held the title of Vice President, Strategy Development and Stakeholder Relations, and was responsible for developing and implementing issues management, reputation and political risk management programs. A lawyer by trade, Toby served as Senior Legal Counsel with the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, after spending nearly five years practising law at Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP in Toronto.

Toby holds a Bachelor of Laws degree and a Master of Arts degree in International Relations from Dalhousie University, a Master of Arts degree from Oxford University, and an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Studies from Trent University.


Moderator,  Panel 3. Community Broadband and Economic Development

Lou Milrad, Lawyer & Tech Law Editor, Public-Private Tech Alliances,  former Chair and CEO of the GTMA (Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance) and former President, BeSpatial. Public-Private Tech Alliances,  former chair and CEO of the GTMA (Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance) and former president, BeSpatial / urisa ontario


Panel 4. Public-Private Partnership (P3), Challenges and Opportunities

David FellCEO, EORN (Eastern Ontario Regional Network Inc.)

Insight:  The EORN PPP Model is based on a fundamental principle of market failure in which public demand for high speed internet access is not being sufficiently addressed in rural regions by private sector ISP’s due to the high cost of building broadband infrastructure. Using an evidence-based and data-driven approach to identify market failure in a region, allows governments to invest the minimum amount of public funding necessary to stimulate the maximum amount of private investment that will be required to close the market failure gap.

David is currently the CEO of the Eastern Ontario Regional Broadband Network (EORN). This Public-Private Partnership (PPP) has invested over $175 million into Eastern Ontario to extend high speed broadband access for rural residents. Prior to his position with EORN, David spent 7 years as Vice President, founder, and co-owner of an eLearning software company called Operitel. Operitel was recognized in 2008 by Profit Magazine as one of Canada’s Top 100 fastest growing profitable companies (on revenues from 2002- 2007). It was also recognized as one of Canada’s Top 50 fastest growing companies in 2006 - PROFIT HOT 50 based on sales growth of 195 percent over two years (2004-2005)

David is Past Chair of the Greater Peterborough Area Economic Development Corporation (GPAEDC) and current Chair of the United Way of Peterborough and District. He completed his Executive MBA at Queen’s University in 2010, and co-authored with Dr. Gary Woodill and Ms. Sheryl Herle: The Mobile Learning Edge: Tools & Technology for Developing Your Teams Wherever They Are, published September 2010 by McGraw-Hill.    

Panel 4. Public-Private Partnership (P3), Challenges and Opportunities

Jonathan Erling, P. Eng. , Executive Director, Global Infrastructure Advisory, KPMG LLP

Insight:  Concerns over access to broadband are similar those associated with access to basic electricity service in the early 20th century.  The service is increasingly fundamental to participation in modern economic life but can be expensive and/or unavailable in rural areas. P3 models can be used to help bridge service gaps but are, in Canada, typically focused more on traditional “hard” infrastructure such as roads, hospitals and transit.  Using P3 models for telecommunications will likely require new approaches, with more thought needed on the implications of technology evolution, appropriate sharing of revenue risks, and differences in the pool of potential business partners.

Jonathan Erling, P.Eng., is an Executive Director in the Infrastructure Group of KPMG’s Toronto office, where he focuses almost exclusively on issues related to utility regulation and investment. This includes consideration of alternative business models and P3 approaches.

He has provided expert testimony at the Ontario Energy Board, the Manitoba Public Utilities Board and the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission (PEI).  His project experience covers the electricity, gas, telecommunications, district energy, and water and wastewater sectors. Jonathan has 29 years of advisory experience with KPMG.

 Panel 4. Public-Private Partnership (P3), Challenges and Opportunities

Josh Van Deurzen , Partner at Torys LLP

Josh is a Partner in Torys’ Infrastructure and Energy group. His practice focuses on large-scale infrastructure projects, with a particular emphasis on public-private partnership and alternative financing and procurement transactions. He represents government authorities, developers, construction contractors, service providers, lenders and underwriters on all aspects of infrastructure development and financing transactions in both Canada and the United States.

Moderator,  Panel 4. Public-Private Partnership (P3), Challenges and Opportunities

Lou Milrad, Lawyer & Tech Law Editor, Public-Private Tech Alliances,  former Chair and CEO of the GTMA (Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance) and former President, BeSpatial. Public-Private Tech Alliances,  former chair and CEO of the GTMA (Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance) and former president, BeSpatial / urisa ontario


 Panel 5. Benchmarking Leading Practices, Canadian Smart Cities Challenge

Alan Mitchell, former Executive Director, Global Cities Centre of Excellence, KPMG

 Insight: 

Over Alan's extensive career, he has focused on working with and for Cities. He has over 30 years of experience in a variety of capacities, including developing Smart Cities, eGovernment / eService solutions, conducting service reviews and introducing program and service based budgeting, to name a few. 

Over the last 20 years, Alan has specialized in the development of program/service models for mapping out the business of cities and local authorities. In this capacity, I have worked with approximately 40 cities across Canada and internationally in support of various transformation initiatives.

Panel 5. Benchmarking Leading Practices, Canadian Smart Cities Challenge

Laura Bradley, P.Eng, General Manager of YorkNet

Insight: Data presents the key to analyzing long term investments and outcomes, in both private sector and public sector. The demand for fibre connectivity is growing at exponential rates and no one entity can meet the fulsome challenges that lie ahead. In Laura’s lastest role as the General Manager of YorkNet., she and her team have developing processes and data points to focus capital build plans and integrate it with asset management plans. While knowing where the end points for connectivity are today, they are not necessarily the only base for the future. Geocoding YorkNet’s data, existing network and future builds will enable the ability to drive reporting as well as monitoring and planning long term asset management requirements.

Laura is the General Manager of YorkNet since operations commenced January 1, 2018. Laura is dedicated to advancing broadband networks into communities to ensure there is adequate and cost effective access to meet current and future demands.

Laura has more 30 years of experience in the telecom industry in Canada working for carriers, manufacturers, ISPs and as a consultant. She brings a wealth of knowledge in business management, network deployment, strategic planning and collaboration to her position. For more than a decade she focussed on programs and projects which helped deliver broadband networks to rural areas, ensuring that users outside of urban communities were preparing for the digital century.

Laura has worked with all three levels of government on various programs and initiatives to further the deployment of broadband networks and initiatives. She believes fibre is the key infrastructure for the future of Smart Community and a necessary foundation for businesses. Laura was a key contributor to the Eastern Ontario Regional Network development including the delivery of a project valued at over $250M to enhance broadband across 50,000 square kilometers.

Laura holds a Bachelor of Applied Science from Queen’s University at Kingston and is a Professional Engineer.

Panel 5. Benchmarking Leading Practices, Canadian Smart Cities Challenge

Patricia McCarney.  President and CEO of the World Council on City Data (WCCD) and is a professor of Political Science and the Director of the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto.

Insight: ISO Standardised Data for Canadian Smart Cities -The World Council on City Data (WCCD) is globally operationalising international standards for cities, developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in Geneva, in order to build globally standardized and comparable city data.  Cities need reliable, comparable data to drive evidence-based planning, investment and policy development. Cities reporting ISO standardized indicators in conformity with the ISO 37120 Series, are ISO certified by the WCCD. Standardised metrics allow city leaders to measure performance and learn from other comparable peer cities globally. This data supports cities in identifying investment opportunities and innovative solutions to integrate cross-cutting technological changes in the global movement towards smart cities.

Patricia has served as Associate Vice President, International Research and Development at the University of Toronto. Professor Patricia McCarney received her Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1987. Before joining the University of Toronto, between 1983 and 1994, Professor McCarney worked as a professional staff member in a number of international agencies, including the World Bank in Washington, and the United Nations – HABITAT in Nairobi. Leading the World Council on City Data, Patricia McCarney is building a globally standardized data base for cities worldwide inviting cities to build city data in conformity with ISO 37120, the first international standard for city data. As host of this new knowledge platform, the WCCD is positioned to be the leading global city data base with standardized, verified, comparable and open city data for a growing network of smart and prosperous cities. This high calibre data is the essential starting point for Smart Cities.


Panel 5. Benchmarking Leading Practices, Canadian Smart Cities Challenge

Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault, Assistant Professor of Critical Media and Big Data, Carleton University 

Insight:  Data and related data technologies are core infrastructure for cities and are more that IT and operations, and I would argue that smart city technologies should be part of urban plans and be discussed with residents. These large technological systems no only manage and monitor infrastructure, they are infrastructure that involve, data, code, algorithms, apps, sensors, and platforms that will manage traffic, utilities, equipment and bridges, but also, they are technologies that observe, survey and nudge social behaviour. It might therefore be time for social and technological impact assessments – social, environment, economic, and public good. We will need to apply systems thinking across all business units, from social services to transit, and integrated across digital strategies, open government and data, and procurement. The ideals of open smart cities are moving us in that direction, and it might be better to start that opening consultative processes now before we get locked into large technological solutions that may not be in the public interest.

Dr. Tracey P. Lauriault is Assistant Professor in Critical Media and Big Data, Communication and Media Studies, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton University and Cross Appointed to the MA in Digital Humanities. Her work on open and big data and open smart cities, is international, transdisciplinary and multi-sectoral. She is one of the founders of the new domain of critical data studies and of open data in Canada and has expertise in data infrastructures, spatial media and smart cities.

Moderator, Panel 5. Benchmarking Leading Practices, Canadian Smart Cities Challenge

Roy Wiseman, co-Chair;  former Executive Director, MISA/ASIM (Canada), former CIO, Region of Peel


Panel 6. Building Smart Cities and Communities of the Future

Andrea McKinney, Chief Digital Officer, City of Hamilton

Andrea McKinney holds the position of Chief Digital Officer at the City of Hamilton. In this position, Andrea is responsible for developing and delivering the City’s Smart City Strategy and Roadmap, Digital Strategy and Open Data program. She is also the City’s lead for CityLAB, an innovation hub that brings together students, academics, and civic leaders to co-create a better Hamilton, in a collaborative partnership with McMaster University, Mohawk College, and Redeemer University. 

Panel 6. Building Smart Cities and the Communities

Campbell Pattersonfounding partner of CP Communications (CPC)

Insight: The purpose of building a smart city or community is to make it more livable for the people that live in them. To accomplish this objective municipalities must create a strategic roadmap for how they are going to take advantage of technology to improve lives of their citizens and tangible measures of success.  This roadmap starts with smart infrastructure as the foundation and charts a course for making investments in digital infrastructure necessary to enable a smart community and that the plan demonstrates a understanding that a smart city is about more than technology, it is about people, processes and technology coming together in an ecosystem. 

Bio: Campbell Patterson is the founding partner of CP Communications (CPC). Campbell's extensive career has seen him working as Account Supervisor for J. Walter Thompson Advertising and VP Marketing for a McDonald’s Restaurants licensee. From a technology perspective, Campbell has developed strategic and marketing plans for such household names as IBM, Hewlett‐Packard, Apple, Sprint, and AT&T.

For the past fifteen years CPC, has been actively engaged helping regions, counties, municipalities, utilities, school boards, hospitals and user‐based consortiums in Canada evaluate broadband networking opportunities, apply for funding assistance, researching and writing business cases, crafting business plans; and designing, procuring, building, deploying, and project managing community broadband networking operations. \

Campbell co‐authored a submission to the Intelligent Community Forum that resulted in the City of Kingston receiving a Top7 intelligent community of the year designation in 2014 out of several hundred submissions from around the world and he is currently the chair of the Technical Committee for ICF Canada working on broadband advocacy issues. CPC was engaged as the technical consultants on the swiftnetwork.ca project to develop the Feasibility Study, Business Case and Funding Application which resulted in the project receiving $180 million in federal and provincial funding, making it the largest publicly funded broadband project in Canada to date, however, CPC has ceased to be involved in SWIFT since mid‐2018. CPC developed similar business cases and technical plans for Niagara Region, Town of Caledon and the Town of Collingwood during this period. CPC authored Intelligent Community Plans each for the City of Niagara Falls and Niagara Region based on the ICF “Virtuous Circle” model. The City of Niagara Falls was selected as a Smart21 Intelligent Community in 2017.

CPC is currently engaged project managing the municipal fibre optic network in the City of Kingston and implementing a smart city strategy developed by the CPC for the City of Kingston which included a broadband infrastructure gap analysis. In addition, CPC is leading the development of a diverse transport fibre build between Toronto and Montreal and the construction of a tier 4 data centre on behalf of Utilities Kingston. CPC is also part of a team developing a Business Plan for the Valley Community Fibre Network in Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia. CPC recently started completing a “one‐dig” policy for the City of Pickering – which is an amendment to their official plan for civil infrastructure to make it faster, easier and cheaper for the municipality and telecom service providers to deploy fibre optic cables throughout the community.

 Panel 6. Building Smart Cities and Communities of the Future

Chris Moore, CIO, Toronto Region Conservation Authority

Insight:  Innovation can live within the public sector, and does in many organizations already. Innovation is key in organizations that want to continue to evolve to the best they can be. In the innovation space there will be leaders and laggards, it’s not a race it is a journey. If you are in a public sector organization that is a leader then support and celebrate this, if you are with a laggard then ask yourself what your role is in developing a culture of innovation.

Chris Moore is the Chief Information Officer at Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the former Chief Information Officer at the City of Edmonton and City of Brampton. Chris is an advocate of an Open Ecosystem, Open Government and Open Innovation. Chris has been described as transformational, innovative and refreshing. He is a sought after International public speaker in the areas of Innovation, Open Government and Gov 2.0. Chris has built his reputation working in the private and public sectors with small, medium and large organizations to help them achieve their information management and information technology potential. From his extensive background in IM/IT, he has gained a unique appreciation for what customers want and need. His experience in managing teams and projects of high complexity and scope allows him to quickly take a strategic view of organizations and map out those initiatives that provide the highest value.

Panel 6. Building Smart Cities and Communities of the Future

Dan Mathers, President and CEO, eleven-x

Insight: Open data and wireless connectivity are catalysts to support the objectives of cities of all sizes as they search for long-term, sustainable methods to help manage assets, energy, and infrastructure. As cities look for new ways to fulfill their strategic and economic development plans, low power, battery operated wireless data solutions featuring low total cost of ownership are providing cost-effective, innovative and scalable applications to meet this need. Additionally, Smart Cities are looking to keep up with today’s connected citizen and provide better programs and services for their community. These solutions are helping with improved resource sustainability and enhanced public service delivery while reducing overall operational costs to offer an enriched community experience.

Bio: As President and CEO of eleven-x, Dan is heading Canada’s leading full-service low power IoT solution provider, enabling Smart City and Enterprise applications that leverage low-cost, long lasting, battery-operated devices for low total cost of ownership IoT programs. Dan also holds an Advisor position with the Investment Accelerator Fund, one of Canada’s largest seed stage investment funds, where he is responsible for driving investments in hardware and software start ups, particularly those focusing on the Internet of Things. Dan is an active member of the innovation ecosystem. A Board of Director and Advisory Board member for multiple for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, Dan has spent time mentoring and coaching a wide variety of organizations across multiple industry sectors.

After starting his career with IBM and Celestica, Dan then moved on to manage the Semiconductor Division at MOSAID, a small-Cap Canadian public Technology Company. Following that he founded several technology start-ups in Ottawa and Waterloo. With over 30 years of experience building and leading technology businesses, Dan has led teams and organizations ranging from start-ups to multinationals that have created more than $1B in shareholder value.

 Panel 6. Building Smart Cities and Communities of the Future

Dr. Sara Diamond, President and Vice-Chancellor, OCAD University

Insight:  Successful future cities will combine a profound commitment to design and values driven solutions. These must combine qualitative tools that engage and mobilize residents and the many other stakeholders in our urban world, and quantitative methods. Data is a critical resource as we manage the complexity of cities. Urban informatics should support the many players in urban planning and service delivery, and allow meaningful responses to possible scenarios. Data tools are equally important for residents and visitors. 

Data driven design can be applied to every urban challenge. For example, research shows that cultural activities create cohesion, enhance quality of life, reduce isolation and crime, and support retention of families and individuals.  For these reasons, successful cities plan and evaluate distributed cultural offerings and expanded public realms by gathering intelligence about diverse communities’ needs, finding means to embed culture and cultural producers in neighbourhoods, and connect transportation planning to cultural hubs.  In other data-driven studies, student post-secondary engagement and success has been correlated with access to transportation as well as affordable housing. While these are intuitive relationships, data provides the hard facts to support effective planning and service delivery for commuter student populations.

Dr. Sara Diamond Diamond holds a PhD in Computing, IT and Engineering, a Masters in Performative New Media Arts and an Honour Bachelors in History and Communications. She founded and led the Banff New Media Institute from 1995 – 2005, establishing summits of artists, designers, scientists and industry, practice based and research workshops, creative co-productions, laboratories and research in new media. Since 20015 she has led OCAD University to retain its traditional strengths in art and design, while transforming the university to become a leader in STEAM+D (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math, Medicine and Design), with capacities in digital media, design research and curriculum. She initiated and funding the Digital Futures Initiative and the Digital Media Research and Innovation Institute; supported OCAD U’s unique research in Inclusive Design and design for health. She collaborated with Indigenous colleagues to develop the Indigenous Visual Culture Program, with correlative prioritization of Indigenous knowledge and culture at OCAD U. In 2018 she received the Inspiring 50 Award for women recognized for the advancement of diversity of STEM fields from the Government of Netherlands and Senate of Canada and the Canada 150 Women Leaders, Champions and Luminaries. She has been awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal for Contributions to Canada; appointed to the Order of Ontario and the Royal Canadian Academy of Art; named as Digital Media Pioneer by the GRAND National Centre of Excellence; and as one of Toronto Life's 50 most influential. 

Diamond  has led or co-led large-scale Canadian and international research networks in data visualization, wearable technologies, mobile technology and content and collaborative systems such as the Mobile Digital Commons Network (MDCN), Am-I-Able, Centre for Information Visualization and Design, and iCity (Visualization theme). She has retained a research and peer reviewed publication practice in history as well as in new media, and arts and design policy, publishing over fifty peer reviewed articles, book chapters and three publications (books/major reports) since 2009. She  has supervised seven post-doctoral researchers and over thirty research assistants while president at OCAD University. Diamond has provided many years of service on public boards, advisory committees, task forces and juries. Diamond’s new media art practice began in creative neural network design, visualization, “software art”, collaborative performance and wearable art through the CodeZebra project in the 1990s. Before that time (1982 - 1995) she was an internationally recognized artist in experimental media, video and interdisciplinary art, with major exhibitions such as a solo show at the Vancouver Art Gallery, a retrospective at National Gallery of Canada, Biennale of Sydney, Museum of Modern Art, NYC and broadcasts of her works. She has curated large-scale new media exhibitions around the world.

 BeSpatial / BeSmart'19 Event Director

Andrew Lyszkiewicz, Director, Strategy & Outreach, BeSpatial and former Head Geospatial Centre, City of Toronto

Insight:  Geospatial is about geography and spatial relationships. Geography provides the location to connect otherwise disconnected data. Spatial relationships provide location-based intelligence. Therefore, geospatial creates business value and social impact. 

Andrew has over 30 years of experience in information technology, mapping and GIS.  For the last 18 years he was driving geospatial implementations in the City of Toronto where he was responsible for the definition and implementation of geospatial data and technology strategy, geospatial service delivery framework and the overall management of geospatial service delivery to internal business units, other levels of government, private organizations and the public.

Andrew’s professional activities also included participation in various programs and initiatives related to information management, technology implementations and governance frameworks. These included Ontario Geospatial Data Exchange, Ontario Road Network, Federal Government GeoConnections Program, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Geo-Smart Program and Intergovernmental Steering Committee for Canadian Community Mapping.

He was also a member of The Conference Board of Canada, Council for Information Technology Executives and a member of Ryerson University Faculty of Arts, Geography Department Advisory Council. Andrew was commissioned as an Ontario Land Surveyor, Ontario Land Information Professional and has been a long term member of BeSpatial / urisa ontario.

Currently retired, he has decided to get involved in the geospatial community of practice in order to pass his experience to the next generation of geospatial professionals. He is currently a member of the board of directors, BeSpatial and serves as Director, Strategy and Outreach.

  co-Chair

Lou Milrad, Lawyer & Tech Law Editor, Public-Private Tech Alliances,  former chair and CEO of the GTMA (Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance) and former president, BeSpatial / urisa ontario

Insight: What are the fundamentals of a Smart City? ... 

According to the Smart Cities Council, ubiquitous broadband telecommunications is a prerequisite for a Smart City” while it must also be livable, sustainable and competitive. Global competitiveness, coupled with both domestic and foreign investment attraction and the potential for new job creation coupled with enhanced tax revenues have been significant driving factors in larger cities. While larger communities are typically better able to organize for the implementation of high-speed Internet availability throughout their respective business and neighbourhoods, thereby enabling transition to a smart city, implementation of “reliable and affordable high-speed” community broadband in rural and northern communities traditionally has been most challenging. What are the fundamentals of a Smart City and how do they apply to the community in which I live, and the one in which I work? What are some of the associated political, legal and business challenges?

Where to start and how to transform into a smart community; of what value is previously digitized land-related data? For example, will it create foundations for roadway and transportation-related sensor locations. Similarly, the ability to utilize enhanced business and location data as a tool for attracting new investment into the community as well as retaining current businesses. What about the fairly recent Canada and Ontario governments broadband funding announcements regarding connectivity in rural and northern communities, do they apply to my community? Will evolving public-private sector collaboration produce funding and construction resources so as to also enable access and implementation of “ reliable and affordable high-speed”community broadband in rural and northern communities?

BIO: Recently retired from almost 50 years in the practice of law, Lou continues in his role as Editor of Computers & Information Technology, published by the Canada Law Book division of Thomson Reuters.

Lou’s career niche has been working closely with and representing an assortment of Canadian municipalities while also fulfilling the role of external General Counsel to a variety of professional and trade associations. These organizations include ITAC (Information Technology Association of Canada), CIPS (Canadian Information Processing Society), KINSA (Kids Internet Safety Alliance), MISA (Municipal Information Systems Society), and BeSpatial (formerly URISA Urban & Regional Information Systems Association, Ontario) of which Lou is also a former President.

In parallel with the practice of law, Lou broadened his hands-on experience and relationship building strengths by accepting the dual role of both CEO and Chair (2 terms) of the GTMA-Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance. The GTMA, now succeeded by Toronto Global consisted of a public-private partnership comprised of the GTA’s 29 area municipalities, the provincial and federal governments, and a complement of professional and service firms, energy and transportation alliances, financial services and technology companies. Its function is to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) into the GTA and to create new jobs within the Region. Experience in initiating and launching” common-purpose” public/private ICT alliances, has provided Lou with a unique background.

 BeSpatial / BeSmart'19 Event Director

Sandra Crutcher, Executive Director, BeSpatial

Insight: 

Hall of Famer, Sandra Crutcher was the 1st inductee into the BeSpatial Geospatial and Information Community's Hall of Fame.  This honour was awarded at the 30th anniversary celebration held in May 2017.  Sandra was recognized as a founding member and for her over 30 years of contribution, influence and impact on the GIS and information community in Ontario. 

Sandra Crutcher serves as the Association's executive director and continues in this position as an ex-officio member of its Board of Directors. She is a charter and honourary member, a past president and has served on all committees. In her executive director role, she is responsible for association, office and board management.  Sandra first joined URISA International in 1985.

Sandra was co-Chair for the 1997 URISA International Conference held in Toronto in July 1997 and has served as the Canadian representative on the Chapter Relations Committee. She has won various leadership and service awards at both the international and local level. At the 1996 annual meeting, Sandra was the first recipient of the URISA Ontario's Exemplary Service award and was once again presented with this award for the second time along with Jury Konga at the 1998 annual meeting. In January 1999, she was appointed the association's executive director. At the May 2008 annual meeting, Sandra was awarded with the prestigious GIS Leadership award for her long-time commitment to supporting and advancing the geospatial and information community's goals.

Sandra worked for the City of Toronto for 26 years in various management and senior management roles representing the information technology needs of business units in areas such as planning, building, public health and corporate I&T. 


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